Shalom Bldg History
GOAL for this year 2011:  Inside COURTYARD 3 Feet Iron FENCING!!!!
Courtyard Building


The four...Sholom Aleichem Houses by Yiddishists, located by Giles Place, the Zionist Farband Houses with United Workers Cooperative colony located in Williamsburg and The Amalgamated Houses bordering the sourthern part of Van Cortlandt Park, were all built with a vision beyond just another apartment.


Art, music, theater, culture,studies and play were employed within these enclosed self maintained communities that empowered the resident leaders who would then go on to further enrich this world.


These interconnecting high-rise Tudor style buildings with large windows were light and airy and expressed a feel of community were built around central courtyards, green spaces, with paths, shaped garden, working fountains and in neighborhoods with parks.
 
(Fort Independence is right across the street form us.)
One particular room beneath Building B on the Sedgwick Avenue side is said to be the meeting place of the Norman Thomas socialists better known as The Right Wing Club.
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AS OF 8/17/2007 VAN CORTLANDT VILLAGE LLC, BECOME THE NEW OWNERS OF THESE BUILDINGS. WE CAN ONLY HOPE THAT THEY SEE THE REAL BEAUTY FROM WITHIN AND NOT JUST FOR INVESTMENT PURPOSES.
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The world changes of course and it will be the countless yesterdays and the shared tomorrows of working side by side creating and maintinaing a courtyard of various gardens representing the beauty of muti-cultures individually living within these walls.
Courtyard in the Spring.
In the beginning before any Tenants first resided within this 270 unit Neo-Tudor living complex, the strictly socialist Shalom Aleichem Houses began building these walls in 1926/27. 
This was home to hundreds of eastern European Jews, mainly garment industrial workers, who upon entering America through Ellis Island came with the belief that it was up to them to alter the world and make it a better place.



These tenant-owners, a union of secular Jewish immigrants rejected the horrible living conditions on the Lower East Side and viewed the Bronx as the perfect place to achieve the American Dream.
Visit The Lower East Side Tenement Building Museum for an opportunity to see how new immigrants really lived back then.



These buildings that I have called home for over 25 years were part of the "Three Bronx Utopias" built by labor union Jewish organizations in the 1920's when the founders four left-wing groups who bought land in the Bronx and with a small investment from each purchaser and subsidized motgages, built low cost co-ops that offered common facilities like social services, libraries, auditoriums, club rooms, (which probably explains why our kitchens are so small and the dinning rooms are so large) and meeting spaces for radical politcal groups

Kwanson tree view from building b
Building A&B

The market crashed in 1929 and the Great Depression had caused many financial pressures in all aspects of people's lives. The managers fought to keep ownership. The Sholem Aleichem complex failed the same year as the crash and along with two other buildings went into foreclosure in1943. Mortgages were sold to landlords who rented the apartments to former owners who had lost their equity, and hundreds of families lost their investments and became renters again.

A walk around the courtyard.
Well Known Resident: Click Here
Well Known Resident: Click Here
Well Known Resident: Click Here